Info

Legacy Code Rocks

Legacy Code Rocks explores the world of modernizing existing software applications. Hosts Andrea Goulet and M. Scott Ford of Corgibytes are out to change the way you think about legacy code. If you’re like a lot of people, when you hear the words “legacy code” it conjures up images of big mainframes and archaic punch card machines. While that’s true — it only tells a small part of the story. The truth is, the code you leave behind is your legacy, so let's make it a good one.
RSS Feed
Legacy Code Rocks
2021
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
October
September
August
July
June
March
February
January


2017
November
October
September
August
July
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: April, 2021
Apr 19, 2021

Common Lisp was written in the 80s as a kind of an amalgam of the existing Lisps at the time. To make sure the Common Lisp would stay relevant, it was made backward compatible so that existing legacy systems could run on it. One thing in common to these big old systems like Lisp is a lot more mutation, and the cool thing about this legacy is that it has a baked experience – it learns and it has learned.

Today we talk to Eric Normand, an experienced functional programmer, trainer, speaker, and consultant on all things functional programming. He started writing Lisp in 2000 and is now a Clojure expert, producing the most comprehensive suite of Clojure training material at purelyfunctional.tv. He also consults with companies to use functional programming to better serve business objectives. 

We talk about problems in legacy code basis utilizing functional programming, the abstract nature of programs, the wisdom of Lisp, and more. 

When you’re done listening to the episode, make sure to check out Eric’s Clojure training and his podcast, as well as connect with him on LinkedIn.

Mentioned in this episode:

Eric Normand on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/eric-normand-61a70366/

Eric Normand’s podcast: Lispcast.com

Eric Normand’s websites: https://lispcast.com and https://purelyfunctional.tv 

Eric Normand’s Clojure training: Purelyfunctional.tv

Eric Normand’s book Grokking Simplicity: https://www.manning.com/books/grokking-simplicity?utm_source=lispcast&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=book_normand_grokking_8_20_19&a_aid=lispcast&a_bid=72596968Use discount code TSSIMPLICITY for 50% off.

Apr 5, 2021

Software engineers perceive that technology advances in an orderly, linear fashion. This makes the novelties very attractive. However, the reality is that we tend to go through technology in cycles.  Recognizing this is crucial for understanding how to make the right technical decisions while preserving the value of the old technology. 

Is it better to build from scratch or build on what you have? When do you invest in something brand new, and when do you lean onto the foundations of the existing expertise? 

Today we search for answers to these questions with Marianne Bellotti, the author of Kill It with Fire –Manage Aging Computer Systems (and Futureproof Modern Ones). Marianne is internationally known for tackling some of the oldest, messiest, and most complicated computer systems in the world, and she currently runs identity and access control at Rebellion Defense. 

When you finish listening to the episode, make sure you follow Marianne on Twitter and get a copy of her book.

Mentioned in this episode:

Marianne Bellotti on Twitter at https://twitter.com/bellmar 

Marianne Bellotti, Kill It with Fire –Manage Aging Computer Systems (and Futureproof Modern Ones) at https://www.amazon.com/Kill-Fire-Manage-Computer-Systems/dp/1718501188  

Rebellion Defence at https://rebelliondefense.com

1